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Ceri: The Final Update

Posted: Monday 25th July 2016 by Emyr MWT

This is the third and last blog regarding the events that happened up to and immediately after Ceri's sad demise last Wednesday evening, 20th July.

 

I realise that often people read blogs months and years after they have been written. It is important to understand what has been said previously - first blog here and second blog here. There is much more information on social media too including Facebook and our DOP Youtube Channel. However, to try and get all the information succinctly in one place, particularly with respect to people reading about Ceri long into the future, the following is a summary of the key events lasting just over a week, in chronological order.

 

Thursday (14th July) - Ceri Fledges

At 09:25 Ceri takes her maiden flight aged 51 days, just about average age. As fledging flights go, it is rather uneventful lasting some 24 seconds - blog here

 

Friday (15th July)

Ceri completes several flights and becomes familiar with landing on the various perches around the nest including the camera pole. Everything is normal.

 

Saturday (16th July)

Ceri continues to fly well and is tackling her own fish by now, grabbing them off Monty and eating them herself - although she doesn't turn down a free feed when offered by Glesni. She is strong and healthy and behaving completely normally for a 7½ week old fledgling.

Ceri's weight is probably approaching 2Kgs by now, she weighed 1.69 Kgs 17 days prior when we ringed her.

Oon Saturday night she roosts on the nest with her younger brother Tegid.

 

Sunday (17th July)

Ceri roosted on the nest with her brother Tegid - everything is normal. Tegid is yet to fledge.

3am - Ceri watches her brother Tegid doing some wing exercises as she spends the whole early morning in the nest.

 

Ceri eats a mullet and a flounder throughout the day. Shortly after eating, for what turned out to the be her last time at 21:03 Sunday evening, she flies off and lands on the larch perch, 10m away from the nest, next to her mother, Glesni.

 

 

23:52 - there seems to be a commotion with Glesni alarm calling for around 20 minutes. On Sunday evening it is not known what causes the commotion, it is pitch black - the IR lamp is designed to illuminate the nest only.


Monday (18th June)

At daylight Ceri is not around, but she did fledge four days prior, so not to have her on the nest or in immediate view is not unusual. However, when Monty later brings a mullet back to the nest shortly after 08:00, Ceri does not return.

We start to look for her using some of the nest PTZ cameras and we find her on the ground shortly before 10:00. Within an hour Ceri takes off from a standing position on the marsh and flies immediately to the larch perch. She had been on the ground just short of 12 hours.

This is not unusual - birds often end up on the ground in the hours and days following fledging.

 

Ceri stays on the perch for just over three hours. She is preening normally, but on closer inspection, it appears that her left wing is ever so slightly lower than her right wing - it is very subtle at this stage. This is 14 hours after initially falling from the perch. Here's a video of her on the larch perch at 13:25 - look at her left wing..

At 14:10 her brother, who only fledged a few minutes before at 12:35, tries to land on the larch perch in what was only his second flight. He tries to land next to Ceri and manages to cause her to get airborne again. She flies for 18 seconds, finally landing back on the nest. This would turn out to be her last flight.

Here's is the video of these events from the previous blog, the sequence where Ceri falls is extremely enhanced to make it brighter and therefore visible:

Immediately after landing Ceri's behaviour looks fine, but after around 10 minutes she starts to show signs of distress and adopts a head-down posture with her left wing slightly drooped. She refuses food for the first time when offered.

Ceri's condition remains the same through to Monday evening, but she is fully aware of what is going on around her and even responds to a few parent alarm calls, adopting the usual thanatosis posture when she does.

We decide not to intervene for the reasons given in Blog 1. Essentially, she is fully capable of flight as she has demonstrated and would bolt as soon as we got anywhere the nest. She would have probably grounded herself and never been seen again. Tegid at this stage has only fledged a few hours prior, we would probably have lost him as well.

 

Tuesday (19th July)

Ceri remains in a hunched over position, squatting on her knees rather than standing up and is refusing food still.

We consult with experts at other osprey projects as well as animal rescue centres here and in the US. We also ask our local vets at Cambrian Veterinary Centre in Machynlleth who also put us in touch with Dr Roy Earle, an experienced veterinarian with years of expertise with birds.

The general consensus coming from all of these guys is the same as we have formulated ourselves. Ceri has probably sustained some injuries, but not broken any bones. Her best chance is to stay in the nest and regain her appetite. We again decide that intervening would cause much more damage than any good it may bring.


Wednesday (20th July)

Ceri looks brighter and is now standing up on her two legs, not her knees. Her eyes look more open than on Tuesday and she looks more alert with her head upright, rather than hunched down, although her left wing is still in a drooped down position.

 

We ask several experts their opinions and again there is consensus that Ceri looks a lot better. By mid afternoon, she seems to be taking a visual interest in food and has been observed exhibiting some food soliciting calls, albeit weak calls.

This video shows how close Glesni got to feeding Ceri on Wednesday afternoon


As it gets dark on Wednesday evening, Ceri is stood upright in the nest facing the wind. At 23:53, exactly three days to the second almost since she fell off the perch, she lays down in the nest and dies.


Thursday & Friday (21st and 22nd July)

We decided not to retrieve her body from the nest as Tegid is still relatively inexperienced at flying - there is still a risk he would be disturbed and flee, not to return. Osprey parents, usually the mother, often take the bodies of deceased chicks away and deposit them over the nest.

 

 

Saturday (22nd July)


Early on Saturday morning, we take the decision to remove Ceri's body from the nest.

The day before I spoke with other osprey colleagues in the UK and based on their advice and the following developments, we took the decision the remove her from the nest

 

1. Neither Glesni nor Monty have been seen to show any inclination to remove the body - it is probably too heavy.

2. As the body decomposed, it poses a contagion risk to the other ospreys, especially Tegid, who iss eating his food practically touching the body.

3. Tegid has been on the wing for five days by Saturday morning - he is a strong flier now. We'd seen him soaring high on extended flights, landing on far away perches on the marsh and on Friday he had a dip in the Dyfi River.


Tegid (left) and Glesni - photographed over Cors Dyfi reserve by volunteer Jamie Maclauchlan

 

We felt it was the correct decision to remove Ceri as the balance of risks had tilted. The risks of Tegid grounding himself on the marsh were very low by Saturday, whereas the risks of leaving the body in the nest, with little chance of it being removed by Glesni or Monty, were becoming greater to the three other ospreys.


On Saturday afternoon we took Ceri's body to the vet so that they could have a look at her and take X-rays. She weighed 1466g.


Monday (25th July)

We collect Ceri's body back from the Cambrian Veterinary Centre and we also get the results of their post mortem:

Here are the main points:

1) No signs of infection, poisoning or disease

2) No fractured bones or damaged joints - see X-ray


3) There are signs of trauma sustained to left side of the bird with soft tissue swelling centred around the proximal humerus, affecting the upper part of the left wing and left upper leg. These injuries would have been sustained in the original fall and taken 1-2 days for the inflammation and bruising to peak.

 


Summary

It now looks beyond reasonable doubt that Ceri died due to the shock from the injuries she sustained following her fall from the larch perch. We did not send her for toxicology tests nor for an autopsy, there was too much internal autolysis (cell and tissue breakdown) for that. This afternoon we buried her on Cors Dyfi Reserve.

Ceri was a strong, healthy osprey and at 54 days old, out of thousands of decisions she took that day, she made one seemingly insignificant and innocuous call - she decided to roost not on her nest, but on a perch for the first time having taken to the air just two days before.

The learning curve for any flying bird species significantly steepens once they take their first flight. Their genes can only take them part of the way to adulthood, luck and random events play a big part too.

The talons of a bird of prey have a mechanism whereby they can sort of 'lock-on' to a perch. Maybe this locking mechanism failed somehow as Ceri made micro-adjustments on the perch?

We first thought this was a tragic freak accident - but was it? I'm not saying young ospreys make a habit of falling off perches, but how often does this type of thing happen? I remember a nervous few hours back in 2007 when a young Glaslyn female, White YB, fell several feet only to find her balance and grasp onto another branch lower down to save her from falling to the ground. Only last night, 24th July, coincidentally exactly a week since Ceri fell from the larch perch, Glaslyn's Blue W8 fell several feet only to be saved by a branch lower down the Silver Fir again. He only fledged the day before.

During the last few years we have seen a huge increase in bird of prey live streaming websites. They have the potential to teach us so much more than we ever though possible before recent advances in cameras, NAS Drive recordings, internet bandwidths and other technologies. But even with all of our cameras and night vision equipment at DOP, we almost missed an osprey falling from a perch - just 10m away from the nest.

Perhaps 10 years from now we may be in a better position to know whether accidents like this are indeed freakish and extremely rare events, or whether they are much more common than we ever thought. Fledglings go missing all the time soon after taking their first flights, I know of three birds from two nests in England that went missing just last week - two of these three are yet to return and by now, probably never will. What happened to these - did they have an accident like Ceri and never made it?

Time, and technology, will answer many questions.


20:20 Hindsight

Hindsight is a wonderful thing, but knowing what we do now, could we have done anything differently?

Ceri had no broken bones - she was capable of flight, just as we had thought. The nest is situated on boggy, tidal marsh on an estuary which takes some time and effort to get to. There is no doubt she would have bolted and probably got grounded somewhere. Without the strength to get her back to the nest, she would have died where she lay. Ceri's best chances were to stay exactly where she was and regain her appetite, after all, bruising and swelling are temporary - they peak at 1 - 2 days as the vets said. We'll never know how close Ceri got to feeling better and starting to eat again.

Every fibre of my being wanted to run out there on Tuesday and Wednesday and 'do something'. My head, and many osprey experts, were telling me different, there was no other way. With 20:20 hindsight, I still can't see another option.

We had to think about Tegid too of course. He hadn't even fledged when Ceri first fell off the larch perch and returned to it the following morning. Losing both of them would have been unimaginable.

Nevertheless, making the right call doesn't make the world a better place all of a sudden. We still lost her, Ceri still died. My conscience is clear, but it still eats at you, it bothers me, it consumes you.


Ceri Hide

Finally, and for the last time, I'd like to thank all of you for your amazing support. DOP would be a very lonely place without you and even if you've never been, we still see and feel you.

Many thanks also to Sian, Daniella and the guys at Cambrian Veterinary Centre. Thanks also to Dr. Roy Earle and everybody else that have helped and advised over the last week. Finally, thanks to Tony Cross and Kim for retrieving Ceri's body with me on Saturday.

Pending some final planning approvals, soon we will start work on a wildlife watching hide over the water pools we created in March on Cors Dyfi Reserve. It will be a brilliant place to see, learn about and photograph wildlife close up, especially all the plants and animals that live and breed on Cors Dyfi's pools.

We were going to call it the Water Hide, but that doesn't really sound that sexy does it? So what else could we call it that would also serve as a lasting tribute to someone we loved but lost far too soon last week? She even flew over the new pools on Sunday morning and clearly saw them.

The "Ceri Hide" it is then.


 

Read Emyr MWT's latest blog entries.

Comments

    I finally was able to read this again, and watch all of the video.

    ...now and again there's a moment
    when the heart cries aloud

    (- poet, Mary Oliver)

    Sunday 14th August 2016
    by Susanna

    Thank you for that heartfelt update. You did the right thing. The Osprey webcam in my area of Boulder, CO has also had a very sad year with 3 chicks dying at about 7 days old. But the 4th chick survived and is getting ready to fledge, maybe even today! Hopeful but anxious for our little #4. Thank you for all you do.

    Thursday 28th July 2016
    by DirePoodle

    Thank you, Emyr, for your clear and heartfelt account of Ceri's death - again the tears come, as for so many of us who watched her and felt our lives touched by hers. I am grateful to these beautiful birds and to all at DOP for making it possible for us to witness part of their extraordinary lives. Long may they soar over the Dyfi.  

    Wednesday 27th July 2016
    by fernfire

    Thank you so much for this heartfelt blog - a befitting tribute to Ceri's life and a special insight into the life of a wildlife worker.   The episode was one of those "damned if you do and damned if you don't" events, but you managed it spot on.  It has been a valuable learning time for all of you and for us, the watchers.   

    Wednesday 27th July 2016
    by Caz9537

    Emyr, it has all been said. That must have been so hard to write, but it has given us all some closure.All the decisions you all made at DOP were necessary and right. Such a short life, but a special one, fly free beautiful Ceri.

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by JennyMW

    Emyr, this must have been a difficult blog to write. It pains me to read it, as have all the others. All the decisions you and the DOP team made over the last week were the right ones. You have my full support. I visited the DOP on July 6 and watched Glesni feeding Ceri and Tegid. I also spoke to the volunteers there. We talked about the Ospreys I see here in Nova Scotia. What incredibly beautiful birds they are. After seeing Glesni, Monty, Ceri and Tegid it has strengthened my love for them. With Ceri, it feels like I lost a friend as I watched her and Tegid from the day Glesni was incubating the eggs and it was a privilege to be there in July. I will return, hopefully next year and visit the Ceri Hide. What a beautiful way to remember her. Ceri is now a part of the Cors Dyfi, she's home, surrounded by you and all the volunteers - her extended family, her friends.  Ceri, you will always live on in my heart. Your vibrancy and zest for life has touched me in a way that words can't describe and since I returned home to Canada, every Osprey nest that I watch in the city that I live, I see the chicks that are nearing fledging age, they remind me of you Ceri - strong and full of life. Tegid you are beautiful and strong, like your Sister was. In just under a month, the most difficult part of your life lays ahead but, you will return to Wales in a few years time and start a family of your own. God's speed and a safe journey my friend.  To you Emyr and all the volunteers, you have my deepest sympathy for the loss of Ceri and my heart felt thanks for a visit I will never forget. Please keep up the great work you all do. leigho Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada 

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by leigho

    Thank you, Emyr, for the lovely and thoughtful post for Ceri.  It couldn't have been easy to write.  I only found this nest after she had been injured and I'm trying very hard not to cry right now. It must have been so hard and so stressful for you being there and NOT running to bundle her up and try to help.  It's hard to remember that wildlife needs as little outside interaction as possible when you watch them grow.  Humans interfering with nature (both on purpose and accidental) often causes more harm. Thank you SOO much for ALL that you do for this site and especially the osprey!

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by Tobey

    Just... Thank you xxxx  

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by Ani

    Ems,  thank you for your grace and calm abiding necessary to make the heartwrenching, though right, decisions in nurturing dear Ceri to the end of her physical life.  This blog is such a loving tribute to her, to her magnificant parents, little brother, and DOP guardians.    It eases the pain in  our collective hearts around the planet as we all gather here to honor and continue our love for, not only the families of Monty and Glesni, but also ospreys everywhere.   Bless you and your DOP team for all you do.    I think the soaring spirits of Ceulan, Nora, Ceri, and beloved others keep  you very close----and will watch the Ceri Hide to come.

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by JPR

    Cors Dyfi is a truly wonderful place and my visit there was the best day of this year even though Ceri was still inside the egg at that stage. The staff there are wonderful and I would recommend anyone to paay a visit however fgar you ahve to travel...I came from Norwich. The blog on Ceri waa so informative, educational and at the same time so moving. Absolutely brilliant. Best wishes and thanks to all of you.

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by wazza

    Cors Dyfi is a truly wonderful place and my visit there was the best day of this year even though Ceri was still inside the egg at that stage. The staff there are wonderful and I would recommend anyone to paay a visit however fgar you ahve to travel...I came from Norwich. The blog on Ceri waa so informative, educational and at the same time so moving. Absolutely brilliant. Best wishes and thank to all of you.

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by wazza

    I am so deeply saddened to hear about Ceri. My Daughter and I visited for the first time on the day Ceri flew fledged and it was a true privilege to see her take a short flight that afternoon. It was a truly marvellous experience to see these four stunning birds. May I also take this opportunity to express how wonderful our visit was. I have mobility difficulties and this is the most accessible birding site I have visited by far. Everything has been designed to ensure access to the Osprey's for all and every member of the team was very friendly, welcoming and extremely knowledgeable. Thank you so much for everything you do at the DOP and I wish you all the best for the future. Thank you also to Emyr for your heartfelt blog which must have been extremely difficult to write.

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by Darren Lawton

    Thank you once again for a moving and informative blog. A most fitting memorial to a beautiful bird. Her life might have been short but she managed to touch so many people.

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by Rhian

    I would just like to add my small voice of support. Everything that could possibly, sensibly and safely have been done, was done. As always, we were kept fully and regularly informed all the way through. Thank you so much for that and for a lovely and fitting final blog for Ceri. 

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by Chloe B

    Beautifully written from the heart.  Ceri was the first osprey I watched from hatching having just found this site last year,and it was so wonderful to be apart of something that would never be seen if not for you brilliant people who give your lives to looking after these magnificent birds.  I have learned so much about the lives of ospreys and marvelled at the parenting from Monty and Glesni. Yes it was heartbreaking watching Ceri after  her accidental fall but you know what this is nature. Sometimes so beautiful to watch it reduces me to tears of joy at being able to be a part of the whole thing at that moment in time. The joy she has given me in her sweet short life will stay with me forever because she was the one who I watched pipping in the egg, she was the one I watched  late evening shoot out of her eggshell with such a zest for life she made me laugh out loud.  She was the one that made me stay up late every night so I could wish her a pesonal goodnight and sweet osprey dreams. She was my teacher of ospreys and I learned not only the joy but also the great sadness.  She was the one that broke my heart. But I would do it all again because she was the one who made me love ospreys.  Thank you from the bottom of my heart to you all who give your time to care for these beautiful birds. Finally her brother Tegid, he is already healing my heart, and Glesni's shouting for fish rings on in my ears long after I switch off for the night. So thank you all once more.

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by valeriebirdloverrobson.

    Thank you so much for this blog, written with huge clarity in what for everyone is a hugely emotional situation, your eloquent way with words meets the occasion yet again.  You have brought together everything needed to understand the situation as it evolved and developed, and now gives closure.  The naming of the new hide is a fitting tribute to Ceri who, in her short life and tragic death, has made Dyfi's supporting community stronger than ever.   Doilch.  xx

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by Joan

    Thank you Emyr. This must also have been a very difficult blog for you to write, knowing how much you care, & also how much the whole DOP Team cares. Putting the information so clearly as you do, is very much appreciated. We know you did everything that could be done in the best possible way & for the right reasons. It is a lovely idea & tribute to name the hide after Ceri. She will be always with us, flying free in the limitless sky!

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by FP1

    Thank you for letting us know, so hard for you, thank you.

    Tuesday 26th July 2016
    by Jo Rihan

    So hard to read this blog, can't see through the tears welling. Maybe because my own pain is raw from losing my 9 1/2 yr old bird a day ago.  It is so hard trying to make decissions that we feel will serve them best. Your love for each of these birds must have kept you in such stress as you watched events unfold. Getting your hopes up, and seeing them drop when the sad outcome prevailed. Thoughts play and replay in your head, with different scenarios and wondering if ..., but with these animals, that are both powerful and extremely fragile, there are no absolute answers. They go downhill fast when they are in pain or not feeling well. They go in a sort of trance, not eating and drinking and getting weaker. By the time they feel better, their bodies are too weakened to climb the steps back to health.  They shut down completely, almost as if accepting that death will be a welcomed visitor.  You will eventually stop questioning your choices, because even though reason tells you that you were corect, your heart keeps wondering. The people that send negative messages, do not know the world of birds. A world with many questions and limited answers. With Ceri, we hate that we know that the injury was survivable, it was not lethal, but we could do nothing but wait.  So sorry for your loss, and ours.  Long live the osprey! If you need donations to cover the necropsy, please let us know. They can be costly. Thank you for loving these birds so much and doing what you can for their wellbeing.

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by cuteus51

    Some weeks are more traumatic than others and the last week has been gut wrenching indeed.   Your blog brings the whole story up to date and will hopefully provide much needed closure.    In the 57 days she lived Ceri provided a lot of pleasure to people around the world. Pity that 57 days was her entire life. Still her life will not be wasted.    I am pleased that things were done as they were as things could have got much worse.  Her life though short will not be forgotten.   

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Tiger

    Ems, just how you have managed to write this gut-wrenchingly, honest, and full blog is beyond me and must have cost you dear. 'Thank you' is inadequate, but you know how I feel.
    That you entered LS chat to post your blog during our virtual, memorial party to celebrate her life, then realising what was going on was priceless! That you joined in, and Janine too was brilliant! Hopefully it has helped you realise how much you are respected and loved. I’ve never known chat go so fast – had it been facebook it would have crashed!
    The window you have opened for us all, to the heart of the Ospreys lives has engendered the development of a family of thousands across many continents whose lives have been drawn closer because of the life of Ospreys, and now, the short life of Ceri.
    As I watched Ceri’s final minutes, I saw her lift her head, stand more upright and lift her wings a little to the breeze, as if to catch the wind and soar upwards, leaving behind her painful body, flying high, flying free, forever young.
    Fanciful? Maybe, but it’s how I shall remember Ceri.
    I can think of nowhere more fitting than to be buried with her siblings of 2012, to become part of Cors Dyfi.
    Ceri’s hide? How apt.
     

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Cas

    That was beautiful. Anyone who reads it can tell you love these osprey with all your heart! And there is absolutely nothing you would not due for them. I believe you where born to take care of them! Thank you for being there voice and protecter. I can say no one could do better! Thank you. Pretty owl 146

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Pretty owl146

    Thanks for this Emyr and for all your dedicated work. And thanks to all the other people involved at the Dyfi oP, you did all the right things. I was one of those privelidged to actually see Ceri's hatching on the live feed, very moving and I shan't forget her. And we still have beautiful Tegid, he's the future.

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by sue g

    Ems, as ever the right chord struck from the head and the heart. The Ceri Hide, of course. We will all cherish her memory and she will live on in ours.

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Nancy

    That last blog was so hard to read but must have been more difficult to write. Nature can be so cruel but her short life was amazing to watch. I'm glad she had no broken bones and although she would have been battered and bruised she didn't suffer but the shock got her in the end, maybe if the second fall hadn't occurred she may still have been with us, but who knows. Thank you for the blogs and the 'Ceri Hide' is a wonderful idea it couldn't be named anything else. RIP Ceri and fly high xx

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Shaz1961

    With tears in my eyes: the Ceri Hide. Long may she be remembered. Well balanced blog: excellent. Thanks to all who contributed in one way or another.

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Theo-N

    Emyr, I always take so much from your blogs. This was the hardest to read I can't begin to imagine how painful it was to write.Every decision you made in this tragic sequence of events was absolutely right. Thanks to you we still have Tegid who is clearly going from strength to strength. .You and the dedicated team at DOP have my constant support Diolch yn fawr.        

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Fiona56

    Dear Emyr & DOP Team, A moving and emotional account of young Ceri's all too short life. While my heart aches I know yours bleeds. All I can do is hope is that you will find solace in time and in your inspirational dedication & work. If there is a spirit, Ceri's will fly free over DYFI and I am sure we will all have her forever in our memories. With thanks for all the wonderful work you all do and for providing us the opportunity to share in a privileged view of nature. Chuckle

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Chuckle

    Thank you for a very emotional blog, brought a tears to my eyes  I am someone who believes that if you can intervene it should be done, Ceulan being a good example, but on this occasion I fully supported you and your team and understood the reasons why it was not appropriate,  Calling the new hide the Ceri Hide is a lovely idea and a great tribute to Ceri.  Thoughts and thanks to all the team and experts.

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Sparkle

    Thank you so much for posting this detailed blog about Ceri.  I read it with teary eyes.   I truly believe the people at DOP absolutely did the right thing!!  Even if Ceri were "rescued" she could have easily succumbed to the stress of being in capitivity.   It didn't make sense to risk Tegid's life.  Ceri was a beautiful angel who left us too soon. I will always remember her.   I would love to someday visit the Ceri hide.  

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by starling5767

    Thank you for all your work at DOP . I'm so glad we made it to see Ceri on the Thursday as she fledged , always special moments visiting DOP. We look forward to visiting Ceri s hide in the future xxx Patsyp

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Patsyp

    Thank you for the blog and the vets report, it must have been really hard for you to write. Thanks so much for all your hard work, after all without you all at DOP we wouldn't have the opportunity to watch our beloved ospreys, even though it can be heartbreaking at times.

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by rcb39

    Thank you, Emyr

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Ram D

    Dear Ems and Team. Thank you for all the information. My heart is with you all. Such a difficult post for you to write yet again Ems. But as always you have done it from the heart and with the upmost respect and professionalism.  Ceri is now in the best place with you all at Dyfi, her birth place. RIP sweetheart and fly free.

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Olwen

    A beautiful and painful blog, so clearly written from your heart. Everything you and the team did was for the best interests of our family and you gave her the best chance you could. I will never forget my week there, sitting in the 360 all day Wednesday waiting for her to fledge, finally watching her fledge at breakfast at Morben then spending the next couple of days watching her find her wings souring around the nest. With any luck, next year I will sit in the Ceri hide and remember those days again, with a smile and a few less tears than I have now.  My thoughts to all the team there, you are a wonderful bunch of people and this year has been so hard in some many ways. Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened...and if that's a little too difficult smile through the tears. RIP in Ceri.

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by CraftyCrafter

    Thank you Emyr and extended team (wherever in the world they are).  A clear summary of events and expected confirmation for your actions through the week.  In the end her little heart just stopped.  Ceri Hide - how appropriate.  annb 

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by annb

    Ems there was nothing more anyone could have done. All the decisions were the right ones within the timeframe and even with the benefit of hindsight," the only exact science" it is clear that you were right. I'm sure all our thoughts are with you and your team.Thank you for keeping us informed throughout what was a harrowing ordeal for you all. Saturday nights 'tribute' along with the previous outpourings of grief is evidence of just how much support you have from your friends on here.    

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Mike Simmonds

    Such a difficult blog for you to write Ems. Once again you tell us just what we want to know. As always, you have our whole hearted support. Lump in throat and tears in eyes again. What a lovely way to remember her short life. Ceri Hide

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Terry

    Thank you. xx  

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by Tilly Trotter

    That can't have been an easy blog to write Emyr, but it had to be done.Thank you for all that you and everyone else at the Dyfi do. All the decisions were the correct ones. Onwards and upwards .....literally.

    Monday 25th July 2016
    by JanP

I finally was able to read this again, and watch all of the video.

...now and again there's a moment
when the heart cries aloud

(- poet, Mary Oliver)

Sunday 14th August 2016
by Susanna

Thank you for that heartfelt update. You did the right thing. The Osprey webcam in my area of Boulder, CO has also had a very sad year with 3 chicks dying at about 7 days old. But the 4th chick survived and is getting ready to fledge, maybe even today! Hopeful but anxious for our little #4. Thank you for all you do.

Thursday 28th July 2016
by DirePoodle

Thank you, Emyr, for your clear and heartfelt account of Ceri's death - again the tears come, as for so many of us who watched her and felt our lives touched by hers. I am grateful to these beautiful birds and to all at DOP for making it possible for us to witness part of their extraordinary lives. Long may they soar over the Dyfi.  

Wednesday 27th July 2016
by fernfire

Thank you so much for this heartfelt blog - a befitting tribute to Ceri's life and a special insight into the life of a wildlife worker.   The episode was one of those "damned if you do and damned if you don't" events, but you managed it spot on.  It has been a valuable learning time for all of you and for us, the watchers.   

Wednesday 27th July 2016
by Caz9537

Emyr, it has all been said. That must have been so hard to write, but it has given us all some closure.All the decisions you all made at DOP were necessary and right. Such a short life, but a special one, fly free beautiful Ceri.

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by JennyMW

Emyr, this must have been a difficult blog to write. It pains me to read it, as have all the others. All the decisions you and the DOP team made over the last week were the right ones. You have my full support. I visited the DOP on July 6 and watched Glesni feeding Ceri and Tegid. I also spoke to the volunteers there. We talked about the Ospreys I see here in Nova Scotia. What incredibly beautiful birds they are. After seeing Glesni, Monty, Ceri and Tegid it has strengthened my love for them. With Ceri, it feels like I lost a friend as I watched her and Tegid from the day Glesni was incubating the eggs and it was a privilege to be there in July. I will return, hopefully next year and visit the Ceri Hide. What a beautiful way to remember her. Ceri is now a part of the Cors Dyfi, she's home, surrounded by you and all the volunteers - her extended family, her friends.  Ceri, you will always live on in my heart. Your vibrancy and zest for life has touched me in a way that words can't describe and since I returned home to Canada, every Osprey nest that I watch in the city that I live, I see the chicks that are nearing fledging age, they remind me of you Ceri - strong and full of life. Tegid you are beautiful and strong, like your Sister was. In just under a month, the most difficult part of your life lays ahead but, you will return to Wales in a few years time and start a family of your own. God's speed and a safe journey my friend.  To you Emyr and all the volunteers, you have my deepest sympathy for the loss of Ceri and my heart felt thanks for a visit I will never forget. Please keep up the great work you all do. leigho Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada 

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by leigho

Thank you, Emyr, for the lovely and thoughtful post for Ceri.  It couldn't have been easy to write.  I only found this nest after she had been injured and I'm trying very hard not to cry right now. It must have been so hard and so stressful for you being there and NOT running to bundle her up and try to help.  It's hard to remember that wildlife needs as little outside interaction as possible when you watch them grow.  Humans interfering with nature (both on purpose and accidental) often causes more harm. Thank you SOO much for ALL that you do for this site and especially the osprey!

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by Tobey

Just... Thank you xxxx  

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by Ani

Ems,  thank you for your grace and calm abiding necessary to make the heartwrenching, though right, decisions in nurturing dear Ceri to the end of her physical life.  This blog is such a loving tribute to her, to her magnificant parents, little brother, and DOP guardians.    It eases the pain in  our collective hearts around the planet as we all gather here to honor and continue our love for, not only the families of Monty and Glesni, but also ospreys everywhere.   Bless you and your DOP team for all you do.    I think the soaring spirits of Ceulan, Nora, Ceri, and beloved others keep  you very close----and will watch the Ceri Hide to come.

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by JPR

Cors Dyfi is a truly wonderful place and my visit there was the best day of this year even though Ceri was still inside the egg at that stage. The staff there are wonderful and I would recommend anyone to paay a visit however fgar you ahve to travel...I came from Norwich. The blog on Ceri waa so informative, educational and at the same time so moving. Absolutely brilliant. Best wishes and thanks to all of you.

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by wazza

Cors Dyfi is a truly wonderful place and my visit there was the best day of this year even though Ceri was still inside the egg at that stage. The staff there are wonderful and I would recommend anyone to paay a visit however fgar you ahve to travel...I came from Norwich. The blog on Ceri waa so informative, educational and at the same time so moving. Absolutely brilliant. Best wishes and thank to all of you.

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by wazza

I am so deeply saddened to hear about Ceri. My Daughter and I visited for the first time on the day Ceri flew fledged and it was a true privilege to see her take a short flight that afternoon. It was a truly marvellous experience to see these four stunning birds. May I also take this opportunity to express how wonderful our visit was. I have mobility difficulties and this is the most accessible birding site I have visited by far. Everything has been designed to ensure access to the Osprey's for all and every member of the team was very friendly, welcoming and extremely knowledgeable. Thank you so much for everything you do at the DOP and I wish you all the best for the future. Thank you also to Emyr for your heartfelt blog which must have been extremely difficult to write.

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by Darren Lawton

Thank you once again for a moving and informative blog. A most fitting memorial to a beautiful bird. Her life might have been short but she managed to touch so many people.

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by Rhian

I would just like to add my small voice of support. Everything that could possibly, sensibly and safely have been done, was done. As always, we were kept fully and regularly informed all the way through. Thank you so much for that and for a lovely and fitting final blog for Ceri. 

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by Chloe B

Beautifully written from the heart.  Ceri was the first osprey I watched from hatching having just found this site last year,and it was so wonderful to be apart of something that would never be seen if not for you brilliant people who give your lives to looking after these magnificent birds.  I have learned so much about the lives of ospreys and marvelled at the parenting from Monty and Glesni. Yes it was heartbreaking watching Ceri after  her accidental fall but you know what this is nature. Sometimes so beautiful to watch it reduces me to tears of joy at being able to be a part of the whole thing at that moment in time. The joy she has given me in her sweet short life will stay with me forever because she was the one who I watched pipping in the egg, she was the one I watched  late evening shoot out of her eggshell with such a zest for life she made me laugh out loud.  She was the one that made me stay up late every night so I could wish her a pesonal goodnight and sweet osprey dreams. She was my teacher of ospreys and I learned not only the joy but also the great sadness.  She was the one that broke my heart. But I would do it all again because she was the one who made me love ospreys.  Thank you from the bottom of my heart to you all who give your time to care for these beautiful birds. Finally her brother Tegid, he is already healing my heart, and Glesni's shouting for fish rings on in my ears long after I switch off for the night. So thank you all once more.

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by valeriebirdloverrobson.

Thank you so much for this blog, written with huge clarity in what for everyone is a hugely emotional situation, your eloquent way with words meets the occasion yet again.  You have brought together everything needed to understand the situation as it evolved and developed, and now gives closure.  The naming of the new hide is a fitting tribute to Ceri who, in her short life and tragic death, has made Dyfi's supporting community stronger than ever.   Doilch.  xx

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by Joan

Thank you Emyr. This must also have been a very difficult blog for you to write, knowing how much you care, & also how much the whole DOP Team cares. Putting the information so clearly as you do, is very much appreciated. We know you did everything that could be done in the best possible way & for the right reasons. It is a lovely idea & tribute to name the hide after Ceri. She will be always with us, flying free in the limitless sky!

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by FP1

Thank you for letting us know, so hard for you, thank you.

Tuesday 26th July 2016
by Jo Rihan

So hard to read this blog, can't see through the tears welling. Maybe because my own pain is raw from losing my 9 1/2 yr old bird a day ago.  It is so hard trying to make decissions that we feel will serve them best. Your love for each of these birds must have kept you in such stress as you watched events unfold. Getting your hopes up, and seeing them drop when the sad outcome prevailed. Thoughts play and replay in your head, with different scenarios and wondering if ..., but with these animals, that are both powerful and extremely fragile, there are no absolute answers. They go downhill fast when they are in pain or not feeling well. They go in a sort of trance, not eating and drinking and getting weaker. By the time they feel better, their bodies are too weakened to climb the steps back to health.  They shut down completely, almost as if accepting that death will be a welcomed visitor.  You will eventually stop questioning your choices, because even though reason tells you that you were corect, your heart keeps wondering. The people that send negative messages, do not know the world of birds. A world with many questions and limited answers. With Ceri, we hate that we know that the injury was survivable, it was not lethal, but we could do nothing but wait.  So sorry for your loss, and ours.  Long live the osprey! If you need donations to cover the necropsy, please let us know. They can be costly. Thank you for loving these birds so much and doing what you can for their wellbeing.

Monday 25th July 2016
by cuteus51

Some weeks are more traumatic than others and the last week has been gut wrenching indeed.   Your blog brings the whole story up to date and will hopefully provide much needed closure.    In the 57 days she lived Ceri provided a lot of pleasure to people around the world. Pity that 57 days was her entire life. Still her life will not be wasted.    I am pleased that things were done as they were as things could have got much worse.  Her life though short will not be forgotten.   

Monday 25th July 2016
by Tiger

Ems, just how you have managed to write this gut-wrenchingly, honest, and full blog is beyond me and must have cost you dear. 'Thank you' is inadequate, but you know how I feel.
That you entered LS chat to post your blog during our virtual, memorial party to celebrate her life, then realising what was going on was priceless! That you joined in, and Janine too was brilliant! Hopefully it has helped you realise how much you are respected and loved. I’ve never known chat go so fast – had it been facebook it would have crashed!
The window you have opened for us all, to the heart of the Ospreys lives has engendered the development of a family of thousands across many continents whose lives have been drawn closer because of the life of Ospreys, and now, the short life of Ceri.
As I watched Ceri’s final minutes, I saw her lift her head, stand more upright and lift her wings a little to the breeze, as if to catch the wind and soar upwards, leaving behind her painful body, flying high, flying free, forever young.
Fanciful? Maybe, but it’s how I shall remember Ceri.
I can think of nowhere more fitting than to be buried with her siblings of 2012, to become part of Cors Dyfi.
Ceri’s hide? How apt.
 

Monday 25th July 2016
by Cas

That was beautiful. Anyone who reads it can tell you love these osprey with all your heart! And there is absolutely nothing you would not due for them. I believe you where born to take care of them! Thank you for being there voice and protecter. I can say no one could do better! Thank you. Pretty owl 146

Monday 25th July 2016
by Pretty owl146

Thanks for this Emyr and for all your dedicated work. And thanks to all the other people involved at the Dyfi oP, you did all the right things. I was one of those privelidged to actually see Ceri's hatching on the live feed, very moving and I shan't forget her. And we still have beautiful Tegid, he's the future.

Monday 25th July 2016
by sue g

Ems, as ever the right chord struck from the head and the heart. The Ceri Hide, of course. We will all cherish her memory and she will live on in ours.

Monday 25th July 2016
by Nancy

That last blog was so hard to read but must have been more difficult to write. Nature can be so cruel but her short life was amazing to watch. I'm glad she had no broken bones and although she would have been battered and bruised she didn't suffer but the shock got her in the end, maybe if the second fall hadn't occurred she may still have been with us, but who knows. Thank you for the blogs and the 'Ceri Hide' is a wonderful idea it couldn't be named anything else. RIP Ceri and fly high xx

Monday 25th July 2016
by Shaz1961

With tears in my eyes: the Ceri Hide. Long may she be remembered. Well balanced blog: excellent. Thanks to all who contributed in one way or another.

Monday 25th July 2016
by Theo-N

Emyr, I always take so much from your blogs. This was the hardest to read I can't begin to imagine how painful it was to write.Every decision you made in this tragic sequence of events was absolutely right. Thanks to you we still have Tegid who is clearly going from strength to strength. .You and the dedicated team at DOP have my constant support Diolch yn fawr.        

Monday 25th July 2016
by Fiona56

Dear Emyr & DOP Team, A moving and emotional account of young Ceri's all too short life. While my heart aches I know yours bleeds. All I can do is hope is that you will find solace in time and in your inspirational dedication & work. If there is a spirit, Ceri's will fly free over DYFI and I am sure we will all have her forever in our memories. With thanks for all the wonderful work you all do and for providing us the opportunity to share in a privileged view of nature. Chuckle

Monday 25th July 2016
by Chuckle

Thank you for a very emotional blog, brought a tears to my eyes  I am someone who believes that if you can intervene it should be done, Ceulan being a good example, but on this occasion I fully supported you and your team and understood the reasons why it was not appropriate,  Calling the new hide the Ceri Hide is a lovely idea and a great tribute to Ceri.  Thoughts and thanks to all the team and experts.

Monday 25th July 2016
by Sparkle

Thank you so much for posting this detailed blog about Ceri.  I read it with teary eyes.   I truly believe the people at DOP absolutely did the right thing!!  Even if Ceri were "rescued" she could have easily succumbed to the stress of being in capitivity.   It didn't make sense to risk Tegid's life.  Ceri was a beautiful angel who left us too soon. I will always remember her.   I would love to someday visit the Ceri hide.  

Monday 25th July 2016
by starling5767

Thank you for all your work at DOP . I'm so glad we made it to see Ceri on the Thursday as she fledged , always special moments visiting DOP. We look forward to visiting Ceri s hide in the future xxx Patsyp

Monday 25th July 2016
by Patsyp

Thank you for the blog and the vets report, it must have been really hard for you to write. Thanks so much for all your hard work, after all without you all at DOP we wouldn't have the opportunity to watch our beloved ospreys, even though it can be heartbreaking at times.

Monday 25th July 2016
by rcb39

Thank you, Emyr

Monday 25th July 2016
by Ram D

Dear Ems and Team. Thank you for all the information. My heart is with you all. Such a difficult post for you to write yet again Ems. But as always you have done it from the heart and with the upmost respect and professionalism.  Ceri is now in the best place with you all at Dyfi, her birth place. RIP sweetheart and fly free.

Monday 25th July 2016
by Olwen

A beautiful and painful blog, so clearly written from your heart. Everything you and the team did was for the best interests of our family and you gave her the best chance you could. I will never forget my week there, sitting in the 360 all day Wednesday waiting for her to fledge, finally watching her fledge at breakfast at Morben then spending the next couple of days watching her find her wings souring around the nest. With any luck, next year I will sit in the Ceri hide and remember those days again, with a smile and a few less tears than I have now.  My thoughts to all the team there, you are a wonderful bunch of people and this year has been so hard in some many ways. Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened...and if that's a little too difficult smile through the tears. RIP in Ceri.

Monday 25th July 2016
by CraftyCrafter

Thank you Emyr and extended team (wherever in the world they are).  A clear summary of events and expected confirmation for your actions through the week.  In the end her little heart just stopped.  Ceri Hide - how appropriate.  annb 

Monday 25th July 2016
by annb

Ems there was nothing more anyone could have done. All the decisions were the right ones within the timeframe and even with the benefit of hindsight," the only exact science" it is clear that you were right. I'm sure all our thoughts are with you and your team.Thank you for keeping us informed throughout what was a harrowing ordeal for you all. Saturday nights 'tribute' along with the previous outpourings of grief is evidence of just how much support you have from your friends on here.    

Monday 25th July 2016
by Mike Simmonds

Such a difficult blog for you to write Ems. Once again you tell us just what we want to know. As always, you have our whole hearted support. Lump in throat and tears in eyes again. What a lovely way to remember her short life. Ceri Hide

Monday 25th July 2016
by Terry

Thank you. xx  

Monday 25th July 2016
by Tilly Trotter

That can't have been an easy blog to write Emyr, but it had to be done.Thank you for all that you and everyone else at the Dyfi do. All the decisions were the correct ones. Onwards and upwards .....literally.

Monday 25th July 2016
by JanP